Category Archives: Kitchen Life

Power Hour: What Makes a Healthy Kitchen?

“What makes a kitchen healthy for employees? Healthy food for restaurant workers? One wage for FOH & BOH? Paid time off? Listen to Saru Jayaraman (Restaurant Opportunities Center United), chef Evan Hanczor (Egg), Kat Kinsman (Tasting Table) and Andrew Friedman (Toqueland, The Front Burner with Jimmy and Andrew) as they dive into approaches for creating a healthy kitchen, restaurant, and environment.”

Learn more about Chef Power Hours at Chefs Collaborative.

Boston Globe: Why working in the restaurant industry can be hard on your mental health

“There’s a Sisyphean nature to the work,” says Strack, who studied psychology before becoming a restaurateur. “It’s accepting and welcoming, but at the same time, there’s an unrelenting nature, which is going to find you out sooner or later. Restaurants are creative and artistic communities with a higher tolerance for eccentric behavior. People are drawn here because it’s an alternative lifestyle. It’s fundamentally different than a 9 to 5 job.”—Kara Baskin

Read “Why working in the restaurant industry can be hard on your mental health” in The Boston Globe.

Good Food: Let’s hear it for the chefs

Hours before the release of the 2016 Michelin Guide, 44-year-old chef Benoit Violier took his own life. Violier’s restaurant Restaurant, de l’Hôtel de Ville, in Switzerland got three Michelin stars in 2015 and ranked at the top of France’s La Liste guide.

Violier’s tragic death has reignited the conversation about stresses that chefs face in kitchens. Kat Kinsman writes about food and mental illness and is an editor at the website Tasting Table. Kinsman talks to Good Food about her new project Chefs with Issues, an online repository collecting first-hand accounts about working in restaurants.

Hear the story at KCRW’s Good Food.

NPR: Chasing An Ideal

“As chef Eric Ziebold tells Morning Edition’s Renee Montagne, the world of elite restaurants is notoriously intense.

‘In the kitchen there’s an incredible physical pressure; it’s not uncommon for it to be an 18-hour day,’ says Ziebold, a Washington, D.C.-based restaurateur who for years was chef de cuisine at Thomas Keller’s Napa Valley restaurant, The French Laundry, which has three Michelin stars.

‘Outside of that, you get into the pressure of everything that it means to be operating a restaurant that isn’t just at the highest level, but a restaurant that is chasing an ideal,’ he says.”

Read and listen to ‘Chasing An Ideal,’ World-Class Chefs Find Themselves Under Extreme Pressure on NPR.